How can records be a credible supplier of service if it doesn’t talk about its impact on organisational performance?

I’ve been looking into benchmarking of records across organisations.

Benchmarking is one of the simple ways that a functional area of an organisation can show that it is a credible supplier to the organisation it serves.

The problem I’m finding is that none of the benchmarking studies address organisational performance, or even the ability to perform to objectives that make sense.

State records studies are particularly odd.

They address attitudes, knowledge, access to training and many other things.

It’s what they don’t address though that I find odd:

  1. Actual compliance.
  2. Outcomes and the costs to achieve them.
  3. Ability to comply with administrative reviews and other reviews that records is purpose built for.
  4. The impact of records on business performance.

If we can’t benchmark these types of things, how do we know we’re credible suppliers of service to our organisations?

If we can’t compare ourselves to one another, how do we know who is doing well, and who we can talk to about how we improve our practice?

How do we know we’re any good?

If you’ve found a great benchmark that’s helped you benchmark and improve your practice – I’d love to know what it was.

2 thoughts on “How can records be a credible supplier of service if it doesn’t talk about its impact on organisational performance?”

    1. Thanks Roger – If you know any organisations that have done it, I’d love to follow this up with them. I’ve found some stuff that Wyndham did a couple of years ago – which is good because it separates the service lines but it doesn’t deal with the link to organisational performance – which is really what I’m looking for.

      I’ve also found a number of benchmarks done by state records but they typically deal with how successful state records is being in getting its records practices implemented, not with whether there is a link to improved performance.

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